San Francisco Renaissance

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San Francisco Renaissance

Post by JohnFester on June 26th 2016, 9:43 pm

Some say that Z was a 'wannabe writer' or maybe he was an actual writer who spelled words wrong intentionally. So the SF Renaissance should at least be mentioned on here.

The term San Francisco Renaissance is used as a global designation for a range of poetic activity centered on San Francisco and which brought it to prominence as a hub of the American poetic avant-garde. However, others (e.g., Alan Watts, Ralph J. Gleason) felt this renaissance was a broader phenomenon and should be seen as also encompassing visual and performing arts, philosophy, cross-cultural interests (particularly those that involved Asian cultures), and new social sensibilities.

Kenneth Rexroth—poet, translator, critic, and author—is generally considered to be the founding father of the renaissance. Rexroth was a prominent second generation modernist poet who corresponded with Ezra Pound and William Carlos Williams and was published in the Objectivist Anthology. He was amongst the first American poets to explore Japanese poetry traditions such as haiku and was also heavily influenced by jazz. If Rexroth was the founding father, Madeline Gleason was the founding mother. During the 1940s, both she and Rexroth befriended a group of younger Berkeley poets consisting of Robert Duncan, Jack Spicer and Robin Blaser. Gleason and Duncan were particularly close and read and criticized each other's work.

In April 1947, Gleason organized the First Festival of Modern Poetry at the Lucien Labaudt Gallery, Gough Street. Over the space of two evenings, she brought twelve poets, including Rexroth, Robert Duncan and Spicer to an audience of young poets and poetry lovers. This was the first public recognition of the range of experimental poetic practice that was current in the city.

During the 1950s, Duncan and Robert Creeley both spent periods of time teaching at Black Mountain College and acted as links between the San Francisco poets and the Black Mountain poets. Many of the San Francisco writers began to publish in Cid Corman's Origin and in the Black Mountain Review, the house journals of the Black Mountain group. Spicer's interest in the cante jondo also led to links with the deep image poets. In 1957, Spicer ran his seminar Poetry as Magic at San Francisco State College with Duncan as a participant.

Impact of the "New American Poetry"
Perhaps the crucial cultural document here was (and is) Donald Allen's anthology The New American Poetry 1945-1960. In this assemblage, Allen had grouped some of the poets "San Francisco Renaissance", and as Marjorie Perloff observes: "Duncan emerg(ed) as the leading poet of this group even as he also belongs to Black Mountain. These poets, who largely became known through oral performance in the Bay Area, include the following thirteen: Brother Antoninus (William Everson), Robin Blaser, Jack Spicer, James Broughton, Madeline Gleason, Helen Adam, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Bruce Boyd, Kirby Doyle, Richard Duerden, Philip Lamantia, Ebbe Borregaard, and Lew Welch."

The Allen anthology was central to defining both the poetics and broader cultural dynamics of a particular historical moment now referred to as the San Francisco Renaissance. Though a particular "generation" had now been named (in large part because of the Allen anthology), today the debate continues as to the viability or use of the term San Francisco Renaissance as a "label" to define an entire era or generation.

Those who believe the term is accurate will argue on the one hand that indeed a "group" did forge a "renaissance": the impact on our historical consciousness was (and is) measurable. Therefore, for them, the use of the term is still verifiable. On the other hand, there are those who argue that the label San Francisco Renaissance is just that: a "label". As a label, therefore, it exists as a convenient and arbitrary "grouping" of something which remains (and even must remain) "unverifiable". Since the impact of such a broad phenomenon on our consciousness cannot be measured, such an impact has not even been recognized or articulated yet, much less addressed as problematic in itself.

Beyond defining itself as itself (i.e. such as defining some measurable impact on consciousness or on ourselves as human beings) critics of the term San Francisco Renaissance argue that beyond that particular use as a label (even if it helps to signal the arrival of a "new" phenomenon not accounted for on our consciousness), a word itself, as such, cannot act for us as an organizing principle. In other words, we are misguided if we do not recognize how this label fails us (beyond a certain usefulness as a label or "grouping") when it comes to truly measuring (much less accounting for) the impact of multiple, broad and dynamic social, political, and artistic changes in our consciousness.

Among those critical of terminology and among those who dare to question how and why it can impact consciousness, asking what that proposes for a definition of the human, perhaps Ron Silliman has been most articulate: ...San Francisco Renaissance is a grouping that I’ve argued before was largely a fiction created by Allen’s need to organize his materials.

The Beats
Around the same time that Duncan, Spicer and Blaser were at Berkeley, Gary Snyder, Philip Whalen and Lew Welch were attending Reed College in Portland together. These three, along with Kirby Doyle, a native San Franciscan, were to form the nucleus of the West Coast wing of the Beat Generation.

Lawrence Ferlinghetti had been studying for a doctorate at the Sorbonne and, while in Paris, he met Kenneth Rexroth, who later persuaded him to go to San Francisco to experience the growing literary scene there. Between 1951 and 1953 Ferlinghetti taught French, wrote literary criticism, and painted. In 1953, he and a business partner established the City Lights Bookstore and started publishing from City Lights Press two years later.

Snyder and Whalen, along with Michael McClure, were among the poets who performed at the famous Six Gallery poetry reading that Kenneth Rexroth organized in San Francisco on October 13 (or October 7, sources vary), 1955. This reading signaled the full emergence of the San Francisco Renaissance into the public consciousness and helped establish the city's reputation as a center for countercultural activity that came to full flower during the hippie years of the 1960s. A short fictional account of this event forms the second chapter of Jack Kerouac's 1958 novel The Dharma Bums. In the account he describes Allen Ginsberg's famous reading of his poem "Howl". Kerouac and Ginsberg had attended the reading with some of their poet friends.

Legacy
The Bay Area-based philosopher and writer Alan Watts, in his autobiography, mentioned that by around 1960 or so "… something else was on the way, in religion, in music, in ethics and sexuality, in our attitudes to nature, and in our whole style of life" He, in his autobiography (p 284) described characteristics of a “ Clear School” of poetry on whose role he included “ Alice Meynell, Walter de la Mare, Emily Dickenson, Kenneth Rexroth, Karl Shapiro, Jean Burden, and Eric Barker(to name a few).” Alan asserted that these poets, employ traditional rhythms and “ say what they have to say with an easy, natural clarity which avoids both clichés and obscure allusions or bizarre, far-fetched images.” (from Watts, In My Own Way).

Some of the songwriters of the upcoming rock-music generation of the mid-1960s and later read and appreciated writers like Kerouac, Snyder, McClure, Ferlinghetti, and Ginsberg (e.g., Bob Dylan, for one, has talked about this). Hence, given that much of the late-'60s wave of groundbreaking rock music developed within rock's famous "San Francisco Sound", it seems very likely that the writers of the San Francisco Renaissance had an influence on the lyrics, both artistically and in terms of attitudes to living.

The "underground press" that developed in America and elsewhere in the 1960s had one of its most interesting and colorful examples in the San Francisco Oracle which reflected the hippie culture and other aspects of the counterculture. The Oracle gave much space to writings by Gary Snyder, Allen Ginsberg, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Michael McClure, and other Beat writers, along with emerging younger writers.

Both Lawrence Ferlinghetti and Michael McClure were featured on-stage in the rock-star jammed The Last Waltz, a documentary and concert film made by Martin Scorsese about The Band (who had an immense following in the late '60s to mid '70s) and a large number of their musical friends.
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Re: San Francisco Renaissance

Post by JohnFester on June 26th 2016, 9:52 pm

I know this has been discussed before but who is the guy that looks like the Stine sketch? The one just right of Allen Ginsberg.




Last edited by JohnFester on June 26th 2016, 9:56 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Re: San Francisco Renaissance

Post by JohnFester on June 26th 2016, 9:54 pm

Lew Welch (left) and Allen Ginsberg.

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Re: San Francisco Renaissance

Post by JohnFester on June 26th 2016, 9:54 pm

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Re: San Francisco Renaissance

Post by Dunderhead99 on June 27th 2016, 9:57 pm

Thou Shall Not Kill by Kenneth Rexroth

I
They are murdering all the young men.
For half a century now, every day,
They have hunted them down and killed them.
They are killing them now.
At this minute, all over the world,
They are killing the young men.
They know ten thousand ways to kill them.
Every year they invent new ones.
In the jungles of Africa,
In the marshes of Asia,
In the deserts of Asia,
In the slave pens of Siberia,
In the slums of Europe,
In the nightclubs of America,
The murderers are at work.


They are stoning Stephen,
They are casting him forth from every city in the world.
Under the Welcome sign,
Under the Rotary emblem,
On the highway in the suburbs,
His body lies under the hurling stones.
He was full of faith and power.
He did great wonders among the people.
They could not stand against his wisdom.
They could not bear the spirit with which he spoke.
He cried out in the name
Of the tabernacle of witness in the wilderness.
They were cut to the heart.
They gnashed against him with their teeth.
They cried out with a loud voice.
They stopped their ears.
They ran on him with one accord.
They cast him out of the city and stoned him.
The witnesses laid down their clothes
At the feet of a man whose name was your name—
You.

You are the murderer.
You are killing the young men.
You are broiling Lawrence on his gridiron.
When you demanded he divulge
The hidden treasures of the spirit,
He showed you the poor.
You set your heart against him.
You seized him and bound him with rage.
You roasted him on a slow fire.
His fat dripped and spurted in the flame.
The smell was sweet to your nose.
He cried out,
“I am cooked on this side,
Turn me over and eat,
You
Eat of my flesh.”


You are murdering the young men.
You are shooting Sebastian with arrows.
He kept the faithful steadfast under persecution.
First you shot him with arrows.
Then you beat him with rods.
Then you threw him in a sewer.
You fear nothing more than courage.
You who turn away your eyes
At the bravery of the young men.

You,
The hyena with polished face and bow tie,
In the office of a billion dollar
Corporation devoted to service;
The vulture dripping with carrion,
Carefully and carelessly robed in imported tweeds,
Lecturing on the Age of Abundance;
The jackal in double-breasted gabardine,
Barking by remote control,
In the United Nations;
The vampire bat seated at the couch head,
Notebook in hand, toying with his decerebrator;
The autonomous, ambulatory cancer,
The Superego in a thousand uniforms;
You, the finger man of behemoth,
The murderer of the young men.
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Re: San Francisco Renaissance

Post by ophion1031 on June 29th 2016, 8:10 pm

John, those photos have been posted on other sites and I know the guy who looks like the Stine sketched was identified but I don't recall the name or anything about the guy.
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Re: San Francisco Renaissance

Post by ophion1031 on June 29th 2016, 8:13 pm

Ahhh found it. Dan Langton was the guy's name.
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Re: San Francisco Renaissance

Post by sandy betts on January 31st 2017, 11:16 am

Boy he sure looks like my other suspect who is RH. The last time I saw him he had shaved his head.Still had the horn rimmed glasses and was a chain smoker.Very shiny shoes, pleated wool dark blue/black pants ( Like Navy pants). Spoke in a formal polite way, but very slowly and monotone. Dead pan eyes about 5 ft 9.
Shoes looked like dressy shoes "wing tipped" ( not wing walkers).They didn't look as large as a 10 1/2. Maybe his boots are larger than his dress shoes?

SF had a "Renaissance" Fair once a year.

A victim by the name of Theresa Colleen Brown worked at the "Renaissance" Bar and restaurant in Walnut Creek Ca.She was forced off of the same road around the same time "someone" tried to force me off, late 80's. Her car flipped, then she was stabbed to death and left in a gully in Pittsburg Ca.

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Re: San Francisco Renaissance

Post by Metal Years on January 31st 2017, 9:04 pm

[quote="JohnFester"]I know this has been discussed before but who is the guy that looks like the Stine sketch? The one just right of Allen Ginsberg.


[/yuote]

I've read a good amount of material on Richard Gaikowski and frankly, I think Earl Van Best is a better Zodiac suspect. I guess what I'm trying to say is that I think Gyke is a piss poor Zodiac suspect.
But I gotta tell ya, Gyke makes a pretty good suspect for being the guy standing next to Allen Ginsberg in these pictures. Especially the top picture.

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Re: San Francisco Renaissance

Post by ophion1031 on January 31st 2017, 9:55 pm

Dan Langton is the name of the man standing next to Ginsberg.
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Re: San Francisco Renaissance

Post by ophion1031 on January 31st 2017, 9:56 pm

sandy betts wrote:Boy he sure looks like my other suspect who is RH. The last time I saw him he had shaved his head.Still had the horn rimmed glasses and was a chain smoker.Very shiny shoes, pleated wool dark blue/black pants ( Like Navy pants). Spoke in a formal polite way, but very slowly and monotone. Dead pan eyes about 5 ft 9.
Shoes looked like dressy shoes "wing tipped" ( not wing walkers).They didn't look as large as a 10 1/2. Maybe his boots are larger than his dress shoes?

SF had a "Renaissance" Fair once a year.

A victim by the name of Theresa Colleen Brown worked at the "Renaissance" Bar and restaurant in Walnut Creek Ca.She was forced off of the same road around the same time "someone" tried to force me off, late 80's. Her car flipped, then she was stabbed to death and left in a gully in Pittsburg Ca.

Any chance your RH suspect could be the same guy? Maybe his RH name is a fake one he uses?
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Re: San Francisco Renaissance

Post by ophion1031 on January 31st 2017, 9:58 pm

More recent photo of Langton:




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Re: San Francisco Renaissance

Post by ophion1031 on January 31st 2017, 9:58 pm

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Re: San Francisco Renaissance

Post by Metal Years on February 1st 2017, 1:55 am

He's a poet. Also a (probably retired) professor at San Francisco State University. He's got a website. He's not on Wikipedia.

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Re: San Francisco Renaissance

Post by sandy betts on February 1st 2017, 2:29 am

The RH who I have seen with the man I have a picture of was born Bobby Hernandez, he changed it after he became a adult. But there are other RH's in his family, one who was in the air force, he has died. I went to his funeral to see if he was the one with the shaved head who spoke like Zodiac, but he was not. I wore a disguise.The man in my picture was there!

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Re: San Francisco Renaissance

Post by ophion1031 on February 1st 2017, 3:42 am

Did Hernandez have a mustache? I think he might be the one you sent me a sketch of.
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Re: San Francisco Renaissance

Post by sandy betts on February 1st 2017, 10:58 am

Yes RH had a thin one. He looked very much like a kidnap-er who took a young woman from Southern Calif. and was arrested up north on Oct 13th 1969. I copied that picture to show how RH looked. That persons name was Robert Harvey age 31.
Being that I didn't have a picture of RH I used that picture to show how he looked , which was very much like Paul Stine. That fit my theory of why Stine's wallet was taken, to be used as the killers ID, to smuggle drugs across Mexico's border. I know that a plane was also used by a group in Vallejo, but that the Feds were getting better at catching people using planes. They mentioned that they had to fly under the radar.

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Re: San Francisco Renaissance

Post by ophion1031 on February 1st 2017, 8:10 pm

Who was the guy with the mustache that you sent me a composite of months ago? I'm pretty sure you have told me before, but I can't remember.
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Re: San Francisco Renaissance

Post by sandy betts on February 1st 2017, 9:43 pm

Both of my suspects have a thin mustache , one is RH and the other is the one I took a picture of, who looks like the age progression picture that I drew. It is on the secret suspect section, in the Sandy's suspect thread.I don't have his name, but I do have names that I am checking to see if that is who he is. I have over 100 license plates that I had ran, so there are a lot of names to check. Some of the plates were stolen.One that I am very interested in getting checked is a personal plate 3 888. Reminds me of the three 8's code.The car was a tan Ford
(Sable).

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Re: San Francisco Renaissance

Post by ophion1031 on February 1st 2017, 10:17 pm

Ok, thanks. I wasn't sure if that was the RH guy or the other suspect that I had seen the sketch of.
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Re: San Francisco Renaissance

Post by Sick E. Von Brutal on February 5th 2017, 3:10 am

didn't one of these guys disappear and there was never a body recovered?
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Re: San Francisco Renaissance

Post by sandy betts on February 5th 2017, 9:43 am

EricX, If you are asking if one of my guys disappeared, they are both alive and well.
In fact one was by my home Friday night. Something has stirred him up , not sure what? Could it be my posts calling him out? I have no idea.

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Re: San Francisco Renaissance

Post by ophion1031 on February 5th 2017, 8:01 pm

He means one of the Renaissance guys, I imagine. Lew Welch did go missing. If I remember correct, he went out into the woods and supposedly shot himself, but his body was never found.
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Re: San Francisco Renaissance

Post by Rocketman on February 18th 2017, 11:35 pm

ophion1031 wrote:He means one of the Renaissance guys, I imagine. Lew Welch did go missing. If I remember correct, he went out into the woods and supposedly shot himself, but his body was never found.

Yep, and Welch was the step-father of musician Huey Lewis.
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